Walt Whitman – “Leaves of Grass”

Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). Though the first edition was published in 1855, Whitman spent most of his professional life writing and re-writing Leaves of Grass, revising it multiple times until his death. This resulted in vastly different editions over four decades—the first a small book of twelve poems and the last a compilation of over 400 poems.

The poems of Leaves of Grass are loosely connected and each represents Whitman’s celebration of his philosophy of life and humanity. … Influenced by Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Transcendentalist movement, itself an offshoot of Romanticism, Whitman’s poetry praises nature and the individual human’s role in it. (Wikipedia)

Flood-tide below me! I see you face to face!

Clouds of the west—sun there half an hour high—I see you also face to face.

Crowds of men and women attired in the usual costumes, how curious you are to me!

On the ferry-boats the hundreds and hundreds that cross, returning home, are more curious to me than you suppose,

And you that shall cross from shore to shore years hence are more to me, and more in my meditations, than you might suppose.

 

Direct link to PDF file

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About Ian

"The less we know of someone, the greater their merits." (Oscar Wilde)
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3 Responses to Walt Whitman – “Leaves of Grass”

  1. António says:

    Okay, Ian thank you for the information about Walt Whitman. I love his writing. I would like to have your help in writing a thesis.

    • Ian says:

      I won’t help with your thesis, though it was okay to ask. I don’t mind. I would encourage you to read literature with as little mind to academic expectations as possible. It’s all about the joy of the written word and the story. That will get you down the road in your thesis: forgetting yourself in the words.

    • Ian says:

      Also, this is not just an information page. The actual book is there too, from the link.

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